Herb Seeds

Showing 19–27 of 70 results

  • Herb Florence Fennel

    R24.00

    Foeniculum vulgare

    Grown specifically for it bulbous stem and used either cooked or raw in salads, a real gourmet item and generally needs to be grown as it’s not available in stores. Best harvested at just about fist sized.
    Companion plants: Lettuce, cabbage, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower and cucumbers.

    Approx. 50 seeds

  • Herb Garlic Chives

    R26.00

    Allium tuberosum

    It is a lovely alternative to normal chives. This is the fastest way to add some flavour to a bland dish or to spruce up a salad. The mild garlic flavour of Garlic Chives is also great in a cream cheese slathered over a few crackers.
    Companion plants: Parsley, apples, carrots, tomatoes, potatoes and brinjals

    Approx. 50 seeds

  • Herb German Chamomile

    R24.00

    Matricaria chamomilla

    Considered by many (along with Lavender) to be amongst the safest of herbs to use. Widely known for its calming and relaxation properties German Chamomile is used in lotions, teas and is extracted for essential oil production. Must be planted in Autumn.
    Companion plants: Everything, but does really well with Cabbage, Cauliflower, Brussels Sprouts, broccoli, onions, leeks and chives.

    Approx. 50 seeds

  • Herb Greek Oregano

    R24.00

    Origanum vulgare

    Italian and Greek dishes are completed with the addition of a pinch of oregano. Bolognaise and addition of a pinch of oregano. Bolognaise and oregano also go together like fish and water…and Pizza, well, oregano is a must along with some basil, naturally. With its trailing habit it is simple to grow and does very well in pots.
    Companion plants: Strawberries, peppers, beans, cabbage, broccoli, brussels sprouts, cauliflower, kohlrabi and turnips.

    Approx. 50 seeds

  • Herb Hamburg Rooted Parsley

    R26.00

    Petroselinum crispum

    The Hambug Rooted parsley is grown specifically for it sweet tender roots. The roots are traditionally used either in soups or as a roast veggie to accompany a roast meal as a side dish.
    It may look like a parsnip, but has a sweet mild parsley flavour all of it’s own. Looking to add some new interest to your dishes, this is one to try.
    Companion plants: Tomato, asparagus, carrot, strawberries, lettuce, beans and mint.

    Approx. 50 seeds

  • Herb Horehound

    R27.00

    Marrubium vulgare

    Horehound is a member of the mint family that is used to make tea and candy that is used for colds and flu, and has recently been used as a flavouring in liqueurs as well.
    The tiny hairs on the oval leaves give them a woolly appearance, that have a musky aroma that loses some of the aroma when dried.
    Companion plants: Cabbage and tomato.

    Approx. 50 seeds

  • Herb Italian Large Leaved Basil

    R24.00

    Ocimum basilicum

    Basil, truly the King of Herbs, is so firmly entrenched in culinary tradition that it’s a rare dish that will not be complimented with the addition of a pinch or two. Italian Giant or Mammoth Basil really gives you value for money with its huge flavoursome leaves. Use it also as the base to a great insect repelling spray for inside your home and on your plants.
    Companion plants: Tomato, peppers, oregano, asparagus, petunias, grapes.

    Approx. 50 seeds

  • Herb Italian Parsley (Flat Leaf)

    R24.00

    Petroselinum hortense

    Traditional flat leaf Italian parsley is one of the world’s most under-rated herbs. It’s not just a garnish, packed with high densities of vitamins and minerals, it makes a great “pick-me-up” if blended into a smoothie or fruit juice. We pick handfuls to add to soups, salads and our juice machine. Pick regularly and remove flower heads to prolong production.
    Companion plants: Tomato, asparagus, carrot, strawberries, lettuce, beans and mint.

    Approx. 50 seeds

  • Herb Korean Mint (Hyssop)

    R24.00

    Agastache rugosa

    Korean mint is a well-known mint plant with a strong liquorice/anise flavour. It is often used in salads, as a tea, to flavour meat and in fish dishes. When planting, just lightly cover the tiny seeds with soil or germination mix. Once they are large enough to handle you can pot them up for a month or two and either plant out or keep them in pots.

    Approx. 50 seeds